Charles L. Cox, Ph.D., P.A.
Clinical Psychology

Charles Cox, Ph.D. - Help in Hurting Times

77 Sugar Creek Center Blvd., Suite 375, Sugar Land, TX 77478   Phone (281) 265-4566

Why Dr. Charles Cox?

It is surprising that depression and anxiety can be so prevalent in "ideal" Fort Bend communities like Sugar Land or Missouri City. Dr. Cox has often remarked about the number of people who seek his help stating that their life is perfect and that they have no reason to feel bad. The problem is that depression and anxiety reside inside of us. They are often not caused by our circumstances.

We experience depression and anxiety for many reasons. Whatever the reason, you want the unhappiness to stop. You want to find help for yourself or for a loved one - a way out. That is the goal of psychotherapy. You want to find someone who can shepherd you, or your loved one, out of the lonely pain. Dr. Charles Cox is that person.

As a clinical psychologist, Dr. Cox specializes in psychotherapy to help with emotional problems such as anxiety and depression. He has over 30 years of experience and success in working with these problems. Through approaches that are practical and that promote healthy change, counseling with Dr. Cox works toward your personal goals, and he tries to help as quickly and as efficiently as possible.

Using different approaches and resources, psychotherapy with Dr. Cox helps clients deal with issues that have caused severe turmoil, cope with current stresses and pressures, and build resilience. His goal is to provide service of sufficient scope, depth, and consideration that clients effectively resolve problems, reduce or eliminate emotional distress, and build skills needed to cope with future stresses.

For an appointment or for additional information about psychotherapy, call:

Charles L. Cox, Ph.D., P.A.
Sugar Land Psychology
  77 Sugar Creek Center Blvd.
Suite 375
Sugar Land, TX 77478
(281) 265-4566





Does Depression Even Exist
in Fort Bend County?


Sugar Land, and Fort Bend County, is a wonderful family environment. Why would we even need a psychologist, or any mental health practitioner, in such an idyllic environment?

I recently had a chance to talk to a friend, who grew up in New York City, about how much I enjoyed my visit there. He remarked that I had hit upon a main difference between NYC and Sugar Land. "New York," he noted, "is a great place to visit, but not such a nice place to grow up in. Sugar Land, on the other hand, is a great place to raise a family, but not such a vacation spot!" I could not agree more!

Fort Bend County is a great place to live and raise a family. Progressive cities, outstanding school systems, an abundance of family-centered activities, and easy access to employment continue to draw people to Fort Bend County. In fact, estimates predict a county-wide population of about 650,000 by 2015 and nearly 900,000 by 2025! In recent years, Fort Bend County has been among the fastest-growing counties both in Texas and in the nation! We are getting more crowded!

Fortunately, forward-looking cities like Sugar Land, Missouri City, Stafford, Richmond, and Rosenberg plan for this growth and for the services that will be required to support and to sustain a growing population.

However, there is a darker undercurrent. In this emphasis on growth and development, what is the effect on individual mental health? Contrary to popular thought, an affluent, suburban life style can have a detrimental effect on measures of happiness and well-being! Could it be that a consistent focus on competing and getting ahead (whether in business, academics, or sports, for example) causes feelings of lowered self-esteem, lowered satisfaction with life, or a sense of failure? Or, does a sense of alienation from the community result from the attitudes of many who move to the area for jobs but without real social connections? In any event, a Needs Assessment of Fort Bend County conducted in 2007 listed mental health as "the biggest weakness in the county's healthcare system."

Whatever the cause, I am constantly amazed at the number of people who seek help stating that they want for nothing, yet feel such a profound sense of unhappiness. Interestingly, this statement applies equally to homemakers and to hard-charging corporate executives. Depression is no respecter of persons!

Where is the help in hurting times?